Q&A: Repossession

Dear Liz: I own a car that I can no longer afford. Unfortunately, buying it was a poor decision and came with terrible interest rates and terms. I've been 30 to 60 days late on the payments for close to a year and have other debts that I haven't been able to pay. Because of this, my credit is already in the basement. I'm underwater on the car (by about $7,000) and am feeling like the only option is to have it "voluntarily" repossessed.

I really feel that if I didn't have this $400 payment and another $200 a month in car-related costs, I could get my other debts squashed, build some savings and get in a much better place financially. I should mention that I have another (free!) car available to me when I need it and live in an area with reliable public transit, plus I have carpooling options that can get me to and from work at little to no cost. I have no major plans for anything that would require amazing credit scores. I have a stable job and rent an apartment with my boyfriend, who has strong credit but not a huge capacity to help financially. Am I insane? How would I even begin to recover from a repossession?

Answer: Having your car repossessed won't relieve you of the debt. In fact, your debt is likely to increase.

Repossession costs such as storage, preparation for sale and attorney fees can be added to your loan balance. You'll owe the difference between that amount and the price the creditor gets for the vehicle when it's resold, often at auction.

If you don't pay what you owe, your creditor can sue you—and probably will, given that nice steady job with reliable wages that can be garnished.

So yes, you probably would be insane to think repossession is the answer to your situation.

Usually the best solution when you owe more than a car is worth is to "drive out of the loan"—in other words, to own the car at least until the loan is paid off. In your case, the best solution may be to park the car while you pay it off. A parked car doesn't need much gas or maintenance (as long as you start it occasionally). You may be able to get discounts on insurance and registration if you don't operate it.

If you still can't make ends meet, then get a second job that will bring in some extra cash. Pay off the loan as quickly as possible and then start saving to pay cash for your next car. Also work on repairing your credit so that if you want loans in the future you'll be able to get decent rates and terms.

Powered by FoolProof

E-Alert

Follow Directions Credit Union